menu

Statement

Fear No Art

I would say my work is more of an approach to interpreting reality rather than a philosophy about it. The only thing I can say for sure is that expressing myself through images is an important part of who I am.

Artist Edward A. Burke In Fishkill NY Studio

The current focus of my art is micro and macro views of environmental processes, including the ebb and flow of energy and our interaction and disruption of these systems. I devote time to researching, observing, and photographing various types of organic structures as they relate to critical environmental issues. These explorations are the subliminal resources for my present work. I begin drawing or painting with no preconceived idea of the end results, exploring marks, forms, and structures. During this initial phase, aspects of the subliminal resources will be reflected in the work. The intension of my art and process is to communicate my personal observations and emotional responses to nature and the environment in a direct way from mind to hand without contrivance.

MY STORY

Self Portrait Drawing Edward Burke

Born in Brooklyn, NY, 1945, he established his reputation as a representational and abstract painter in the 1980’s, particularly regionalist landscapes represented in his series "Reflective Still Water" in and around northern Westchester New York.

He was raised in Brooklyn, attended The High School of Art & Design in Manhattan and graduated in 1964. He continued his art education at the School of Visual Arts while working as a full time commercial artist in small advertising agencies around New York City. His serious pursuit of painting began in 1970. Simultaneously he was also developing his career as a book designer and art director for educational publishers.

“A single grade school event by a dedicated and caring teacher (Mrs. Hall) set my life on a path in art. Mrs. Hall recognized my artistic ability and helped me find a meaningful place in the school by assigning me to create elaborate blackboard chalk drawings for all the school events and holidays. This simple thoughtful act helped my self-esteem and set my life’s path in art. She suggested that I apply to the High School of Art and Design in Manhattan

That school was a revelation – it valued something at which I was innately good – creating art.  It was a place to explore a variety of art disciplines: photography, watercolor, sculpture, graphics, advertising, drawing, and painting.  By the third year I was required to choose between a fine art or a commercial art focus.  Although my real love was fine art, I had to find a way of earning a living, so I chose commercial art.  However, throughout my life I have never given up my love of fine art and the self-expression of painting.  To be candid, during those last two years I skipped as many academic classes as possible to sit in on unassigned painting classes taught by Tom Wasselmann.  Nevertheless, I graduated successfully in 1964.

It was impossible for me to attend college due to cost – I simply had to find work and earn money.  Venturing out in Manhattan with my portfolio of illustrations and graphic designs in hand, I found some part-time work in small advertising agencies that lasted about two years.  I was able to parlay that experience into a full-time position as a book designer at Macmillan Publishing.  Within a few years I launched my first graphics design business ”Creative Publishing Concepts” located in Manhattan.

While earning a living in graphic design I was also studying and developing my drawing and painting skills: I drew and painted on evenings and weekends, I visited galleries and museums in Manhattan at every opportunity, and I took studio-painting classes with John Gundelfinger at the School of Visual Arts in NYC.  In this way, I was able to balance painting and graphics and developed sufficient skills to obtain commissions, have my paintings exhibited, and win awards as an art director.

My career in graphic design and fine art has been greatly influenced by an amalgam of family, colleagues, authors, artists, friends, educators and the vast resources available to me in New York City.  In graphics I was and am inspired by the work and design principles of Josef Albers and Paul Rand, and in painting by Modigliani, Matisse, Picasso, De Kooning, and Warhol.

My most rewarding professional experience was a painting commission to raise money for the victims of Hurricane Katrina. The National Electrical Manufactures Representative Association (NEMRA) commissioned the work. The original painting was auctioned in New Orleans, the auction price and the sales of prints were donated to the Habitat for Humanity/New Orleans to build a home in the Musician’s Village. "It was a great privilege to be part of this effort.”

New Orleans Preservation Band & Edward Burke

The Preservation Band of New Orleans and Edward Burke
at the Paramount theater in Peekskill, NY

Videos

Lecture & Discussion

  • Ed Burke Contemporary PaintingRecent work at Gallery 25N
    Plastic Sea by Edward BurkeCompositional Elements In New Painting
    Contemporary painting Palstc Sea by Ed BurkeGenesis for the painting "Plastic Sea"
    Discussion of New Paintings and Art Process
    Edward Burke Drawing FIshkill StudioPaintings and the Process for Creating art
    Ed Burke Contemporary PaintingRelationship between current and previous paintings

Portfolio Overview

Painting Plastic Sea by Ed Burke Abstract Art

 

If pushed to categorize my new work, I would say that it falls close to “Ambiguous Abstraction”* The work is created from a distillation of my painting language. The compositions and language consist of strokes, marks and scraffito**. It is yet another evolution in my painting expressing itself through a simplified color palette and symbolic imagery.

--Edward a Burke

Recent Work

  • Painting Detail Ed Burke

    Lady Of The Snow

    The genesis for my recent works subject matter and imagery can be from obvious or not so obvious impressions of daily life or the chaotic warehouse of dreams. The compositions, forms and imagery are not planned, for example I did not intend to paint the poem “Lady Of The Snow” by Terry Lennon nor the plastic waste compromising the oceans in “Plastic Sea”. I began work, as I do for most paintings by making a mark on the canvas then responding to that mark with and other mark and so on building the painting, however somewhere in the process of intuitive responses to the paint, an image emerges bending the shapes, influencing the composition and the subject is revealed.

  • Painting Detail In Out Edward A Burke

    In Out

    The compositions of "In Out" and "Lady Of The Snow" are both balanced by the mass of larger forms pressing inward on a smaller center form, the same principle you would find in an architectural arch using a keystone to hold the arch in place. Both compositions use organic and geometric shapes to convey their narratives. In the painting "In Out" the yellow center form seems to be held in place by the pressure and mass of the large forms pressing against it.

*Ambiguous Abstraction: is generally seen as an opposition to ‘pure abstraction’ where the subject of the painting is its own form, The work embrace broad topics such as memory, subconscious and presence, materiality and transcendence.

** Scraffito: is an ancient technique in which a layer of paint is scratched through to reveal a contrasting layer of paint. Any tool can be used to scratch though the paint, eg: a brush handle, pallet knife, etc.

Paintings

  • Contemporary Painting Detail Ed Burke
    Contemporary Painting Detail Ed Burke
    Contemporary Painting Detail Ed Burke
    Contemporary Painting Detail Ed Burke
    Edward A Burke Painting Solid Carbon Block
    Abstract Painting Detail Ed Burke
    Abstract Painting Detail Ed Burke
    Abstract Oil Painting Detail Ed Burke
    Abstract Acrylic Painting Detail Ed Burke
    Abstract Painting Detail Ed Burke
    Modern Painting Detail Ed Burke
    Contemporary Art Painting Detail Edward A  Burke
    Contemporary Art Painting Detail Edward A  Burke
    Contemporary Art Painting Detail Edward A  Burke

Drawings

  • Contemporary Art Drawing Edward Burke
    Modern Art Edward Burke
    Exspremental Drawing Ed Burke
    Acrylic Paning Paper Drawing Burke
    Graphite Drawing By ed Burke
    Pencil Drawing By Edward Burke
    Drawing Metal Smoke By ed burke
    Contemporary Art Drawing Edward Burke
    Contemporary Drawing By Edward A Burke
    Contemporary Art Drawing Edward Burke
    Contemporary Art Drawing Edward Burke
    Contemporary Art Drawing Edward Burke

Art In Location

Edward Burke - Painting Lady of the Snow

This catalog is a selection of new paintings by Edward Burke showing his work in various corporate settings, lobbies, boardrooms and office spaces to demonstrate how the work can enhance these spaces.

“If pushed to categorize my new work, I would say that it falls close to “Ambiguous Abstraction”* The work is created from a distillation of my painting language. The compositions and language consist of strokes, marks and scraffito**. It is yet another evolution in my painting expressing itself through a simplified color palette and symbolic imagery.

EAB

This new work is available to commercial properties, for a limited exhibit, at no cost. The available work can be displayed at any suitable public lobby, atrium or space for a six-month period free or purchased, rented or leased as follows:

Original work can also be commissioned for site-specific locations in the follow ways:

Existing Painting Inventory:

  • Display the art a period of time free then return it without obligation.
  • Purchase the art outright at any time during or after the free displaying of the painting.
  • The work can be purchased over time with a simple payment schedule.
  • Paintings can be leased including a rotating selection of work.

Commissioned Paintings:

An original work can be commissioned to accommodate an existing space. For commissioned work a photo presentation of the work in the targeted location will be presented for approval before the final work commences.

Commissioned work can also be created with a payment schedule.

Previous Work:

Earlier work in locations can be found at the end of this catalog.

*Ambiguous Abstraction: is generally seen as an opposition to ‘pure abstraction’ where the subject of the painting is its own form, The work embrace broad topics such as memory, subconscious and presence, materiality and transcendence.

** Scraffito: is an ancient technique in which a layer of paint is scratched through to reveal a contrasting layer of paint. Any tool can be used to scratch though the paint, eg: a brush handle, pallet knife, etc.

Art In Location

Catalog

  • Art In Commercial Spaces - Edward Burke NY
    Art In Commercial Spaces - Edward Burke NJ
    Art In Commercial Spaces - Edward Burke CT
    Art In Commercial Spaces - Edward Burke Westchester NY
    Art In Commercial Spaces - Edward Burke White Planes NY
    Art Interior Desing - Edward Burke NY
    Art Interior Desing - Edward Burke NY
    Art Interior Desing - Edward Burke NY
    Art Interior Desing - Edward Burke NY
    Art Interior Desing - Edward Burke NY
    Art Interior Desing - Edward Burke NJ
    Art Interior Desing - Edward Burke NY
    Art Interior Desing - Edward Burke Manhattan NY

ArtWork Literature

  • Persistent Thoughts, Arguments and Symbols

    Ed Burke - Peekskill NY Studio

    The paintings selected for this folio represent a shift in my creative process and have evolved from what are persistent thoughts, arguments and symbols. These ideas are playing out over and over in my mind and in my current paintings, much like a commercial jingle or phrase that gets stuck in your head...

    + Read more...

    Early Spring - Painting From Three Sources

    Ed Burke - Peekskill, NY studio

    My paintings evolve from three sources: direct observation of the external world, my mind’s eye, and my subconscious. Direct observation forms the basis for most representational art. The mind’s eye is the store of observed images which each of us collects throughout our lives. Finally, works from the subconscious strive to completely shut down the first two sources...

    + Read more...

    Still Water - Reflective Surface

    Large Scall Paintng Croton - on - hudson ny ed burke
    Ed Burke - Croton NY Studio

    This period of work began as small representational paintings of the shorelines of ponds and lakes using oils on watercolor paper. The work progressed to large-scale impressionistic style canvases capturing the tranquil energy, textures, patterns and rhythmic movements of water surfaces as breezes passes over them…

    + Read more...
  • Elements of design

    20
    June 20, 2011 | Posted by: Admin | Category

    Lorem Ipsum is simply dummy text of the printing and typesetting industry. Lorem Ipsum has been the industry's standard dummy text ever since the 1500s, when an unknown printer took a galley of type and scrambled it to make a type specimen book. It has survived not only five centuries, but also the leap into electronic typesetting, remaining essentially unchanged.

    + Read more...

    New Template

    35
    June 20, 2011 | Posted by: Admin | Category

    Lorem Ipsum is simply dummy text of the printing and typesetting industry. Lorem Ipsum has been the industry's standard dummy text ever since the 1500s, when an unknown printer took a galley of type and scrambled it to make a type specimen book. It has survived not only five centuries, but also the leap into electronic typesetting, remaining essentially unchanged.

    + Read more...

    Lorem Ipsum

    June 20, 2011 | Posted by: Admin | Category

    Lorem Ipsum is simply dummy text of the printing and typesetting industry. Lorem Ipsum has been the industry's standard dummy text ever since the 1500s, when an unknown printer took a galley of type and scrambled it to make a type specimen book. It has survived not only five centuries, but also the leap into electronic typesetting, remaining essentially unchanged.

    + Read more...

Persistent Thoughts, Arguments and Symbols

Ed Burke - Peekskill NY Studio

The paintings selected for this folio represent a shift in my creative process and have evolved from what are persistent thoughts, arguments and symbols. These ideas are playing out over and over in my mind and in my current paintings, much like a commercial jingle or phrase that gets stuck in your head “Winston Taste Good Like a Cigarette should”, or noxious but stuck in the annals of one’s mind.

In 2007 there was a change in my creative process and the intention of my art. The content of the paintings were no longer about interpreting the world around me from three sources; direct observation, the minds eye and the id. New ideas, gestures and symbols were demanding attention, my nagging thoughts and concerns regarding the impact of government, religion, and economic models on the environment and humanity.

The three paintings titled, “Master Card”, “Visa Card” and “Amex Card”, contain symbols that are reoccurring in many of my paintings. The three factory smoke stacks, shown active with billowing smoke and others times dormant, is a simple visual idea that represents the conundrum of manufacturing the economy vs. providing a healthy environment. Can we improve our economy without damaging our environment? These images and symbols flood my conscious when I am in the studio and are now finding their way to the canvas.

  • Master Card
    Visa Card
    AmEx Card

The series of paintings “Black Cross Mythologies”, I address the argument of ancient religious mythologies that the concept of “faith” is evidence to prove the validity of various religious ideas. Bertrand Russell’s parable of the celestial teapot has been incorporated into the painting titled “Black Cross Mythologies – Celestial Teapot”. The parable’s theory is that one can have the same steadfast belief that a teapot is orbiting the solar system as they can have in any other religious idea, as either argument only requires “faith” as validation.

  • Black Cross Mythology - Creation
    Black Cross Mythology - Wo-Man
    Black Cross Mythology - Celestial Teapot

Another idea that drives this body of work is developing groups of paintings that interact with each other. Although these paintings are composed to have an esthetic and content that allows each work to stand on its own, it is also intended that grouped together the paintings’ impact and significance is intensified. I am intrigued with the idea that these paintings at some point may never be seen together again. They may reside in different locations yet they will always be joined together by the intentional intertwined relationship that allows these paintings to communicate something bigger when they are together then when they are apart.

  • Envirofacturing Green Dot
    Envirofacturing Red Dot

Conceptually the idea is to see paintings as if they were stills from a film where the compositional elements (the cast of characters) move and change, reinvent them selves or new characters might enter the frame. The paintings are realized as if they were out-takes from a film of random thoughts from a nonlinear thinker.

Edward A Burke

Early Spring - Panting From Three Sources

Ed Burke in Peekskill, NY studio

My paintings evolve from the following three sources: direct observation of the external world, my mind’s eye, and my id/ subconscious. Direct observation is the most easily understood and forms the basis for most representational art. The mind’s eye is the store of observed images which each of us collects throughout our lives. Works using this source will have recognizable images or symbols but will distort and manipulate them into new visual experiences. Finally, works from the id strive to completely shut down the first two sources and rely totally on the stimuli from the subconscious coupled to an aesthetic reaction to the marks and forms accumulating on the canvas. This source generates visceral and spontaneous abstract paintings that grow organically with little reference to the external world — either observed or remembered.



In 2007 I completed a series of paintings “Early Spring” which embodies creating from these three sources. The content for these paintings comes from a tradition in our home. Every year in late winter my wife Lorraine arranges a bouquet of yellow tulips and places it in front of a window framing winters stark scene. She creates our own “Early Spring” helping us fend off the doldrums of winter as we begin to anticipate the warmth of spring. I have interpreted this simple content in five paintings utilizing the three different sources. Although I did not start out to paint a series, as the work progressed I began to see that the works were forming a narrative of how I think and create. These works range from representational to abstract. The ends of this range are theoretical and not so neatly defined. It is clear that representational paintings are in some ways abstract as they represent a three-dimensional world on a two dimensional surface utilizing a myriad of personal choices that drive the creation of the work. Many of these choices are driven by the artist’s subconscious even when working from direct observation. Likewise works derived primarily from the subconscious are influenced by the artist’s internal collection of images and responses to the real world.

A majority of artists find their voice by working across this range and eventually settle on a narrow segment to produce their main body of work. My creative process has not and possibly never will settle down to a small segment of this range. I draw from combinations of direct observations, the minds eye and the id producing works that fall across a wide range from representational to abstract. The resulting works are bound together by my language: that of brush and color.

The paintings included in this folio are listed below in the order in which they were painted:

“Early Spring” was painted from direct observation as a representational interpretation of the vase of yellow tulips in front of a window framing winter outside.

Early Spring Medium: Oil / Canvas Dimensions: 36" x 36"

“Early Spring Unpainted” began from direct observation and was a fully realized representational painting. I allowed my mind’s eye to reinterpret the composition by un-painting the highly rendered forms and reshaping the overall composition to create a different visual experience.

Early Spring - Unpainted Medium: Oil / Canvas Dimensions: 36" x 36"

“Early Spring Cubed” is drawn from my mind’s stored images. I abandoned all direct observation of the external scene to create this painting. This process forced me to access these stored images and filter them through my own aesthetics thus reinventing the composition.

Early Spring - Cubed Medium: Oil / Canvas Dimensions: 36" x 36"

“Early Spring Espresso-ism” was painted using energetic color and paint movement. The idea of winter versus spring is articulated in warm and cool colors. The objects are painted as symbolic representations and disregard the observed truth of the forms, lights and darks, and subtleties of color.

Early Spring - Espresso-ism Medium: Oil / Canvas Dimensions: 36" x 36"

“Early Spring Yellow and Blue” comes primarily from the id/subconscious yet maintains some trace relationship to external stimuli and the mind’s eye. This painting draws on my intuitive reaction to the idea of “Early Spring” versus the images that comprised the original still life. Moreover, yellow and blue assert the fundamental concept of early spring as warm and cool.

Early Spring - Yellow & Blue Medium: Oil / Canvas Dimensions: 36" x 36"

Edward A Burke

Still Water - Reflective Surface

Ed Burke - Croton NY Studio

This period of painting began as small representational landscapes of the shorelines of ponds, lakes and other small bodies of water in and around Croton-on-Hudson and other Westchester NY locations. After relocating my studio from an urban environment of the city to the peaceful settings of Croton, I found inspiration in the scenery, especially the ponds and lakes near my new studio. For the first time I began to paint landscapes on location (plein air) that would become a large body of work.

I started my exploration of painting landscapes by painting with Hudson Valley artist George Kelly on location. His landscapes intrigued me with their bold use of color and single large brush strokes defining landmasses in his paintings. Kelly is part of the New Hudson River School of painting, I considered him the Abstract Expressionist or Fauvist view apposed to Frederic Church’s romantic view of the river. His work inspired me and for a short time my work was derivative of his approach to painting landscapes, an example of this is my painting titled “Winds of Storm King”.

  • Edward Burke Winds of Storm King
    George Kelly Looking North From Bear Mountain
    Frederic Church Hudson River Scene At Sunset

When I found my voice for expressing landscapes it began as small representational landscapes painted on canvas with oil paints. I found that the oils on canvas did not dry fast enough, I could only paint wet into wet, this did not allow me to complete a painting in one sitting. I began to experiment with painting oils on water color paper. This worked well as the oil paint absorbed into the paper and if the paint was used thinned it would dry quickly allowing me to paint wet over dry and enabled me to finish a painting in one session on location.

  • Overcast Day Croton Reservoir
    Mt. Arey Pond
    Delicate Ripples
    Evening Breeze
    Reflective Studies
    Washington Street Pond

    As I painted these traditional landscapes I began to find the patterns, textures, and rhythms of the water’s surface intriguing and demanding of my attention. I began to interpret the landscapes reflected in the surface of the water. These were small 18” x 24” paintings, oil on watercolor paper. As I began to develop a painting language / techniques for creating the scenes, I worked on large-scale paintings from the small on site studies. These larger paintings were painted on stretched canvas (60” x 48”) with oil paints. Applying thick textured paint and allowing it to dry before the next application of paint and so on, to build the desired texture to the surface created the textures and contrast for the shimmering light in the painting. I began to paint panoramic scenes, up to nine feet during this period.

    Reflections
    Autumn Reflection
    Croton Pond Sunrise
    Reflections Croton Reservoir
    Croton Pond Sunrise

    This body of work became more and more abstract as it progressed, finally ending with the painting “Red Streak”. This painting is a transition painting into a new body of work “Paintings From The Subconscious”. Red Streak is a departure from the process of creating the reflective surface paintings in that it was not from observation, nor the mind’s eye, it was a different and more visceral approach to creating works of art.

    Red Streak

Edward A Burke

Elements of design

20
June 20, 2011 | Posted by: Admin | Category

Lorem Ipsum is simply dummy text of the printing and typesetting industry. Lorem Ipsum has been the industry's standard dummy text ever since the 1500s, when an unknown printer took a galley of type and scrambled it to make a type specimen book. It has survived not only five centuries, but also the leap into electronic typesetting, remaining essentially unchanged.

Lorem Ipsum is simply dummy text of the printing and typesetting industry. Lorem Ipsum has been the industry's standard dummy text ever since the 1500s, when an unknown printer took a galley of type and scrambled it to make a type specimen book. It has survived not only five centuries, but also the leap into electronic typesetting, remaining essentially unchanged.Lorem Ipsum is simply dummy text of the printing and typesetting industry. Lorem Ipsum has been the industry's standard dummy text ever since the 1500s, when an unknown printer took a galley of type and scrambled it to make a type specimen book. It has survived not only five centuries, but also the leap into electronic typesetting, remaining essentially unchanged.

Elements of design

35
June 20, 2011 | Posted by: Admin | Category

Lorem Ipsum is simply dummy text of the printing and typesetting industry. Lorem Ipsum has been the industry's standard dummy text ever since the 1500s, when an unknown printer took a galley of type and scrambled it to make a type specimen book. It has survived not only five centuries, but also the leap into electronic typesetting, remaining essentially unchanged.

Lorem Ipsum is simply dummy text of the printing and typesetting industry. Lorem Ipsum has been the industry's standard dummy text ever since the 1500s, when an unknown printer took a galley of type and scrambled it to make a type specimen book. It has survived not only five centuries, but also the leap into electronic typesetting, remaining essentially unchanged.Lorem Ipsum is simply dummy text of the printing and typesetting industry. Lorem Ipsum has been the industry's standard dummy text ever since the 1500s, when an unknown printer took a galley of type and scrambled it to make a type specimen book. It has survived not only five centuries, but also the leap into electronic typesetting, remaining essentially unchanged.

Elements of design

19
June 20, 2011 | Posted by: Admin | 15 Comments

Lorem Ipsum is simply dummy text of the printing and typesetting industry. Lorem Ipsum has been the industry's standard dummy text ever since the 1500s, when an unknown printer took a galley of type and scrambled it to make a type specimen book. It has survived not only five centuries, but also the leap into electronic typesetting, remaining essentially unchanged.

Lorem Ipsum is simply dummy text of the printing and typesetting industry. Lorem Ipsum has been the industry's standard dummy text ever since the 1500s, when an unknown printer took a galley of type and scrambled it to make a type specimen book. It has survived not only five centuries, but also the leap into electronic typesetting, remaining essentially unchanged.Lorem Ipsum is simply dummy text of the printing and typesetting industry. Lorem Ipsum has been the industry's standard dummy text ever since the 1500s, when an unknown printer took a galley of type and scrambled it to make a type specimen book. It has survived not only five centuries, but also the leap into electronic typesetting, remaining essentially unchanged.

Teaching Philosophy

Drawing & Painting Lessons

My teaching philosophy emerges from my personal experience as a struggling grade school student and the ability of a remarkable teacher to guide and motivate me. This life lesson is the core of my teaching philosophy. Teaching is more than the delivery of curriculum measured by standardized testing. While these components are important an educator can and should be more. Teachers need to inspire, encourage and mentor students. Teaching is, in a way, a performance, an art form in its own right and must be molded and transformed as circumstances arise, so to meet the needs and expectation of the students.

The art teacher must cultivate a non-intimidating and encouraging environment that fosters participation and self-expression.   This requires a balance of pedagogical content, skill practice and a flexible responsiveness to the classroom environment.  I have sought to achieve this balance in the way I teach and interact with the class and with individual students.

The place of learning (classroom/ studio) and its physical and emotional environment play an important role in the learning process of fine art, as in no other discipline. Rearranging the classroom/studio for a specific lesson or exercise can impact the lesson immensely. For me it is akin to a theatrical stage where different sets must be used to transform scenes. This flexible environment allows for lecture, demonstration and practice simultaneously.

My goal is to assist the student in finding a path to think and live as an artist both in and outside of the classroom, and to understand that the evolution and advancement of art is like a living organism. Each new artistic endeavor, from kindergarten art teacher to Picasso, is an element in the advancement of art and every student, teacher, art lover and master artist plays an important part in that evolution.

Edward A. Burke

Student Testimonials and Drawing & Painting Lessons

Edward Burke Exserimental Drawing

Contact

Drawing in Fishkill NY Studio

Edward A. Burke

“Possibility is the opiate of the artist.” Edward A. Burke

Have no fear of perfection, you'll never reach it.” Salvador Dali .

“I don't paint dreams or nightmares, I paint my own reality.” Frida Kahlo

Every child is an artist. The problem is how to remain an artist once he grows up.” Pablo Picasso

Tel:+ 845-260-5665

E-mail: